M87 Black Hole with an sbig 6303 E and a Plane Wave CDK 20

Discussion in 'My Astrophotos' started by Alan Josefsek, May 2, 2019.

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  1. Alan Josefsek

    Alan Josefsek Cyanogen Customer

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  2. Colin Haig

    Colin Haig Staff Member

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    Alan, what are we really looking at here? Looks like a whole pile of planetary nebula... How about some technical data or a FITS image?
     
  3. Alan Josefsek

    Alan Josefsek Cyanogen Customer

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    Colin, They are all M87 with the a CDK20 and STL6303e . I sent them to Plane Wave and they feel I got the Black hole as well as I. These are 29 stacked with CCD soft. I used the planetary filter in CCD soft and then opened the file in A Microsoft viewer and then edit with Zeke (Orange one ) and zoomed in. The smaller image is prior to zooming in using the Microsoft viewer. You can clearly see the "jet" in the lesser processed images. I have others that are very blown out and overexposed not revealing the black hole. As requested here are some fit files.
     

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  4. Vikrant Kumar Agnihotri

    Vikrant Kumar Agnihotri Cyanogen Customer

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    Hello Alan

    I am afraid as the black hole size (event horizon diameter) estimated was with 50µas(microarcsecond), and can not be identified with even 20inch CDK.
    [​IMG]
    See note: https://aasnova.org/2019/04/10/first-images-of-a-black-hole-from-the-event-horizon-telescope/

    The M87 image scale around 57 arc second and Event horizon comes 1/1000000 times smaller.
    [​IMG]
    Again the final image of a black hole is not visible optical. It is a false color image of radio (a kind of audio) signals after post-processing.

    If we see, telescope setup used (20inchCDK+1603CCD). The plate scale comes 0.54"/pixel. The highest resolution achieves only 0.54". If we really want to see the event horizon then we need 0.000009µm x 0.000009µm pixel CCD.:)

    Regards
    Vikrant
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2019
  5. Doug

    Doug Staff Member

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    Radio is a kind of light - both are electromagnetic radiation. However the telescope for viewing those wavelengths is VERY different, and is essentially as large as planet Earth!
     
  6. Vikrant Kumar Agnihotri

    Vikrant Kumar Agnihotri Cyanogen Customer

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    Yes Sir..:)
     
  7. Alan Josefsek

    Alan Josefsek Cyanogen Customer

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    Ok, so what is the dark part of my image?
     
  8. Doug

    Doug Staff Member

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    I'd have to see the raw data, but I'm guessing it's a saturation artifact. The core of M87 is super bright, and it probably saturated your detector resulting in a flat top. If you did any sharpening on that image the flat top would turn into a dip, and voila!
     
  9. Alan Josefsek

    Alan Josefsek Cyanogen Customer

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    I used CCD Soft Lucy Richardson. Combine add. Planetary, zooming plus Microsoft jpg viewer.
     
  10. Vikrant Kumar Agnihotri

    Vikrant Kumar Agnihotri Cyanogen Customer

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    Hello Mr. Alan

    The M87 is a kind of elliptical galaxy, and its center is much violent than our Milkyway (so chosen for event horizon project). The galactic clouds and dust create a kind of opaque wall (highly ionized medium supposed to be there at accretion disk) for the visible spectrum from 400nm-700nm, but NIR/IR/microwave and Radio frequencies may cross it very well. The outer side of M87 is lesser thick so we can see the synchrotron plasma jet towards UV end.

    I saw the beautiful luminance filter image by you, but here we need really a very very big radio telescope and interferometry to enhance the signal and resolution.

    here something interesting for us (a bit funny too): https://www.fnal.gov/pub/science/inquiring/questions/mikep.html

    Regards
    Vikrant
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2019
  11. Doug

    Doug Staff Member

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    Okay the Lucy Richardson algorithm created the dark area in the middle, because it was saturated. It's just a processing artefact.
     
  12. Alan Josefsek

    Alan Josefsek Cyanogen Customer

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    Thanks for the feedback. M87 is an interesting imaging object.
     
  13. Colin Haig

    Colin Haig Staff Member

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    Yes, it sure is an interesting object. Thank you for imaging it and sharing your data. Was a great discussion. Am looking forward to seeing what else you come up with.
     

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