Shutter timing STXL6303 w Self guiding filter wheel

Discussion in 'STX and STXL' started by Bradley Walter, Dec 1, 2019 at 7:24 AM.

  1. Bradley Walter

    Bradley Walter Cyanogen Customer

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2015
    Messages:
    19
    I am looking for
    1. Shutter latency. i.e. the mean time from software commands the shutter to open/close and the time the shutter is fully open or fully closed
    2. 1 sigma variation in those times
    3. Opening/closing times - the time between when the rotating window starts to illuminate the chip until the window is in the full open position and the analogous time for closing. I know the shutter is much faster than an iris shutter but what I am looking for is the rotating shutter equivalent to the time duration from when an iris shutter starts to open until it is fully open and the time from when the shutter starts to close until it is fully closed (but not necessarily stopped in the case of the rotating shutter).
    4. 1 sigma variation in the times in #3.

    I can't find any info on shutter timing in the manual that came with my camera and filter wheel.
     
  2. Doug

    Doug Staff Member

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  3. Bradley Walter

    Bradley Walter Cyanogen Customer

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2015
    Messages:
    19
    I am aware of the Maxim utility and it would be helpful if I had a lens I could mount to my STXL that would come to focus closer than half a football field away from the camera. Do you know the time for the shutter wheel to move from closed to open and open to closed position? Iris shutters I have purchased for astronomical cameras have specs on the mechanical opening and closing times of the shutters. I know the SBIG cameras are supposed to have "photometric" shutters that cause much less vignetting/gradient than iris shutters. One of the things I am trying to determine is the minimum EXPTIME I can use for flats and have a shutter induced gradient of less than 0.1% max-min. With a good iris shutter that is about 10 seconds for a well maintained shutter. You should also know the response time of the camera, from the time it receives the signal in a "ready" state to the time the shutter is open, at least when the camera is new.
     
  4. Doug

    Doug Staff Member

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    The age of the camera will not matter. The shutter actuator is a stepper motor. It will either work at precisely the same speed every time, or it will not work at all.

    The shutter takes 500 ms to move from the closed position to the opened position, and vice-versa. The shutter aperture is 100 degrees wide.
     

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